COVID UPDATE: Due to current COVID mandates the Society will be open “by appointment only” until further notice. Appointments are on first come first served basis and determined by Red Tier restrictions. Please call in advance for an appointment. COVID protocols apply, including but not limited to, masks, social distancing, sanitizing, and questionnaires upon entry.  The health and safety of our staff, volunteers, and community members, remains of the utmost importance to us. Please contact us with questions. We can be reached by email at shs@shastahistorical.org, or by hone at (530)243-3720, and we will respond promptly. Thank you for your patience and support during these unusual times.3

Shasta Historical society

Current Exhibits

“Black and White in Black and White”: Images of Dignity, Hope and Diversity in America

 

For General public access to the exhibit beginning April 12th, 2021, click here.

To view the  monthly program click here.

In 1965, 16-year-old Doug Keister acquired 280 glass plate negatives, originally found at a local garage sale. He immediately made prints from some of the plates, revealing powerful, early 20th-century portraits of African Americans in Lincoln, Nebraska. These astonishing images are now on display in a new traveling exhibition curated by Keister, Black and White in Black and White: Images of Dignity, Hope, and Diversity in America. This exhibition appears on the Society website [www.shastahistorical.org]  from March 11, 2021 to June 3, 2021. 

Black and White in Black and White features striking photographs attributed to African American photographer John Johnson. Using his Lincoln neighborhood as his canvas, Johnson crafted these ennobling images of his friends and family between 1910 and 1925. Equally as important as Johnson’s depictions of African Americans are his images of blacks, whites, and other racial groups together, an occurrence that was almost unheard of at the time.

The Smithsonian Institution recently acquired 60 of these photographs for their collection. Michèle Gates Moresi, curator at the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, underscores the importance of Johnson’s work: “They speak to a time and a place where African Americans were treated as second-class citizens but lived their lives with dignity…You can read about it and hear people talk about it, but to actually see the images is something entirely different.” 

Additional related Society programming can be found at www.shastahistorical.org/calendar/program. 

Exhibition Support:  Black and White in Black and White: Images of Dignity, Hope, and Diversity in America is curated by Douglas Keister, traveled by Exhibit Envoy, and presented with support from California State University, Chico.

Exhibit Envoy provides traveling exhibitions and professional services to museums, libraries, cultural centers, and universities.  Our mission is to build new perspectives, create innovative exhibitions and solutions, and advance institutions in service to their communities.  For more information, please visit www.exhibitenvoy.org.